Earthquake

Earthquake

Drawing of house with crack

Storm / Flooding

Coulds with lightning bolts and rain

Contagious Disease

Drawing of person coughing

Terrorism

Gun scope target drawing

Evacuation

Drawing of person running

Power Outage

Broken Power Line Pole

Fire

Fire drawing

Tsunami

Drawing of wave coming down on house

Shelter In Place

Person under roof

If you are indoors when an earthquake starts

  • "DROP, COVER AND HOLD ON."
  • Avoid windows, hanging objects, mirrors, tall furniture, large appliances and cabinets filled with heavy objects.
  • Do not try to run out of the structure during strong shaking.
  • If you are downtown, it is safer to remain inside a building after an earthquake unless there is a fire or gas leak. There are no open areas in downtown Los Angeles far enough from glass or other falling debris to be considered safe refuge sites. Glass from high-rise buildings does not always fall straight down; it can catch a wind current and travel great distances.
  • If you are in bed, stay there and cover your head with a pillow.
  • Do not use elevators.
  • If you use a wheelchair, lock the wheels and cover your head.

If you are outdoors when shaking starts

  • Move to a clear area if you can safely walk. Avoid power lines, buildings, and trees.
  • If you're driving, pull to the side of the road and stop. Avoid stopping under overhead hazards.
  • If you are on the beach, move to higher ground. An earthquake can cause a tsunami.

Once the earthquake shaking stops

  • Check the people around you for injuries; provide first aid. Do not move seriously injured persons unless they are in immediate danger.
  • Check around you for dangerous conditions, such as fires, downed power lines, and structure damage.
  • If you have fire extinguishers and are trained to use them, put out small fires immediately.
  • Turn off the gas only if you smell gas.
  • Check your phones to be sure they have not shaken off the hook and are tying up a line.
  • Inspect your home for damage.

If you are trapped in the debris

  • Move as little as possible so that you don't kick up dust. Cover your nose and mouth with a handkerchief or clothing.
  • Tap on a pipe or wall so that rescuers can hear where you are. Use a whistle if one is available. Shout only as a last resort.